FAULTY BUILDING MATERIALS SCANDAL HEATS UP

Written on the 24 July 2015

FAULTY BUILDING MATERIALS SCANDAL HEATS UP

NON-COMPLIANT building products have been blamed for fires which tore through Melbourne's Lacrosse Apartments last year, according to findings by the Metropolitan Fire Brigade.

Chinese-made Alucobest aluminium cladding, a material which does not meet Australian safety standards and which was used in construction of the building, is found to have fuelled the blaze.

More worrying is the fact this same product has been used in hundreds of other buildings, including many in the Brisbane area, according to legal professionals and industry workers.

Bennett & Philp Lawyers Brisbane director Mark O'Connor says pressure is growing for an industry standards review, while investigations have been undertaken by relevant regulatory bodies involving hundreds of other potentially affected high rises in Melbourne and Brisbane.

"There's been little public discussion here about this issue, but nationwide it's shaping up to be another scandal involving cheap imported products that have not been subjected to Australian standards testing," says O'Connor.

He says there needs to be a greater public awareness of inferior products, warning builders and tradesmen to be aware of the severe consequences before constructing with any defective materials.

"If someone is looking to save money by using cheap and untested products, then they need to know they can be held liable if the products cause injury or death," says O'Connor.

"It's not illegal to import a non-compliant building product but it is illegal to use it; paper-based certification is unreliable and can be highly dangerous."

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) deputy chair Dr Michael Schaper issued a statement assuring the public that all specialist bodies responsible for enforcing codes in each state will be investigating product origins and the safety of building materials used.

"The ACCC encourages builders and their representatives to work closely with their building regulators to complement the ACCC's consumer product safety initiative to encourage safe product stewardship," says Schaper.

"All retailers and wholesalers need to manage the quality assurance of goods they procure.

"This can be achieved through testing and inspection of finished goods, by monitoring the supply chain and by adopting safe and reliable procurement practices such as dealing with established suppliers they know and trust or developing such relationships with new suppliers."


Latest News

AUSTRALIA READY TO DISRUPT GLOBAL CARBON FIBRE MANUFACTURING

AUSTRALIA for the first time has the capacity to produce carbon fibre from scratch and at scale, following the launch...

HONG KONG FUND INVESTS $212.8 MILLION IN G8 EDUCATION

G8 EDUCATION (ASX: GEM) has secured $212.8 million from Hong Kong-based CFCG Investment Partners to pay down debt and...

MERGER DELIVERS THE FINANCIAL GOODS FOR TERRY WHITE

TERRY White Group has posted a solid half-year net profit of $1.3 million amid a period of major transformation fo...

BLUE SKY APPOINTS TWO NEW INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS

BLUE Sky Alternative Investments (ASX: BLA) has appointed two new independent, non-executive directors to its board: ...

Related News

WHY EMPLOYEE-OWNED COMPANIES ARE BEATING ASX200 SHARE PRICES

EMPLOYEE-owned companies command a higher share price than their publicly listed peers, reaping a 17 per cent prem...

RISE OF THE MACHINES HAS WORKERS SWEATING

UP TO 3.8 million Australian workers are fearful their job may soon be terminated by a robot, a new survey has shown....

LESS TALK, MORE SMALL BUSINESS ACTION IN 2017

THE future growth and prosperity of Australian SMEs could be undermined if governments lose sight of the sector...

TEST DRIVE A POST GRAD AT BOND

THERE'S only one way to really move your career into the fast lane, says Bond University, and 'test driving...

Contact us

Email News Update Sign Up Contact Details
Subscriptions

PO Box 2087
Brisbane QLD 4001

LoginTell a FriendSign Up to Newsletter