GLOBAL INTERACTIVE'S GROWTH SHIFTS A GEAR

Written on the 23 July 2015

GLOBAL INTERACTIVE'S GROWTH SHIFTS A GEAR

IT is a Gold Coast company that has seen turnover grow from $1 million to $15 million in the last three years.

But Global Interactive refuses to slow down, with the sales solution company aiming to double in size over the next two years. 

Working across dozens of client groups, Global Interactive claims to be the new breed of face-to-face direct selling that operates and subcontracts direct sales teams in the charity, education, finance and telecoms sectors with clients including RSPCA, RSL, Mater Prize Homes and Surf Life Saving.

The Surfers paradise-based Global Interactive was established in 2002 and now has offices in every Australian capital city and in regional areas including Newcastle, Wollongong and the Sunshine Coast.

Three years ago the company's annual revenue held steady between $1 million to $1.5 million. Under the leadership of CEO Danny Dimas (pictured), who implemented a restructure, the turnover swelled to $5 million in 2012, followed by spikes to $12 million and then $15 million in the following two years.

"The restructure enabled rapid growth by streamlining a lot of ineffective processes, refining human resources to maximise effectiveness and an overhaul of training and development," Dimas says.

"We embrace change, adapt to our client's needs, evolve with technology and contribute to modern cultural, societal and behavioural change which I believe is integral to the company's growth."

The vision for the company is now to introduce new product lines, grow existing ones and establish a presence in the offshore markets of Europe and the US.

The company specialises in door-to-door, business-to-business, in-store, street marketing and event marketing communications and has launched new call centre facilities.

Global Interactive also includes an educational software arm - Yolo Tutoring - as well as a recruitment, training, development and entrepreneurial support division.

While the services required for commercial enterprises and not-for-profit organisations share the common factors of high customer service and low risk, Dimas says charities in particular are attracted to the model.

"When you compare the up-front costs of traditional marketing such as TV, radio, outdoor and digital advertising, the efficiency of a direct-sales structure just outstrips it, particularly for charities," Dimas says.

"Not only do we deliver actual customers but we deliver a high return on investment which is what everyone is essentially seeking."

Dimas attributes the success of the company to values, vision, people and culture - the latter he characterises with the Greek word philotimo.

"It's an ethos that was ingrained in us growing up that loosely relates to respect, honour and integrity but it's hard to define it exactly in English," Dimas says.

"It's the most untranslatable word in the Greek language and literally means friend of honour but is so much more. For Greeks it is like breathing, and it really does define the spirit of the company."

Global Interactive staff numbers are now more than 200, with Dimas impassioned by the company's opportunity and development-based culture.

People movement and internal growth is also a key to the company's success.

"There are no time restrictions on advancement and when they (staff) hit a criteria, they get promoted - it's a simple and incredibly effective reward structure," says Dimas.

"I have managers in their early 20s earning over six figures because there is no real seniority. In that one day you might be working for someone but could easily overtake them in time based on your own progression and results."

Dimas sees endless opportunities for the future of outsourced fast sales technologies and says south-east Queensland has provided the ideal time and place to execute his master plan.

"It is also absolutely vital to stop, consolidate, review and revise once in a while as time is a very valuable asset and a wise use of it is to really take a breath and think very deeply about the absolute best ways forward," he says.

"The way we did things was very different 10 years ago even five or two years ago and the 'adapt or die' adage has never rung more true."


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